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Saskatoon police chief Troy Cooper to retire

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Saskatoon police chief Troy Cooper announced his retirement during a news conference on Thursday.

"As we move into 2024 and begin engagement for our next strategic plan, it is the most appropriate time for me to step aside and let new leadership hear directly from the community,” Cooper said.

"It has been my honour to serve with members of the Saskatoon Police Service for the past six years and my pleasure to work with such a committed and community minded Board of Police Commissioners.”

Cooper took over the top job at the Saskatoon Police Service in January 2018, replacing outgoing chief Clive Weighill.

In March, Cooper's contract was extended until the end of 2025. According to a news release from the police board, Cooper has been in policing for over 36 years.

“The board hired Chief Cooper based on his extensive policing experience but also for his strong reputation as a community leader, and his strength in building relationships to address some of the root causes of crime,” said commision chair Jo Custead.

“We are confident in saying he will be greatly missed not only by the Board, but by the many organizations he has been partnering with over the years to achieve the Board’s mission of creating a culture of community safety in Saskatoon.”

Cooper says he plans to stay on until Jan.16.

--This is a developing story. More details to come.

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