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Saskatoon Berries prepare for first regular season game

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With the season just around the corner, the Saskatoon Berries are ripe for action.

At Cairns Field, the team is busy practicing and gelling together ahead of their first regular season game this weekend.

Saskatoon has not had a baseball team at this level since the Yellowjackets shuttered in 2014.

Coach Joe Carnahan expressed the team's excitement, especially among local players.

"When they were younger, they came and watched the college guys at that time. Now, for them to actually be here to play at home and represent their city is something they're very excited for," said Carnahan.

Nolan Sparks, an outfielder, is a local talent who has traveled across North America playing baseball. Now, he's thrilled to play for Saskatoon again.

"It's been a long journey, playing since I was 3-4 years old. I've moved across the US and Canada to play baseball, so it means a lot to be at home playing in front of my family and friends," Sparks said.

Pitcher Cory Wouters, also from Saskatoon, recognizes some of his teammates from minor baseball.

"There are a few guys that I've played with and against my whole life. It's nice that I get to play with some of the guys I've only played against. It's great to play with them on the same team," Wouters said.

The Berries will play their first-ever game in Regina on Saturday, kicking off the season with a battle of Highway 11. Wouters anticipates a strong turnout for the game.

"Everyone's excited. Being close to them, it's going to be a short trip. There's going to be people from everywhere coming out to watch it. Regina coming here with us, and Saskatoon people going there," Wouters said.

Following their game in Regina, the Berries will bring the series back to Saskatoon for their home opener—another game against the Regina Red Sox—on Tuesday at Cairns Field.

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