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Here are the artists you can see at this summer's Sask. Jazz Festival

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The SaskTel Saskatchewan Jazz Festival has announced its 2023 ticketed lineup.

On Thursday, July 6 you can catch headliner Amanda Marshall along with the Beaches, STORRY, Mauvey, and Priyanka on stage at the festival's new Victoria Park location.

On Friday, July 7, Serena Ryder will headline. Blackie and The Rodeo Kings with Daniel Lanios and Terra Lightfoot, Devin Cuddy Band, Fred Penner and Celeigh Cardinal will take the stage throughout the day

The Saturday, July 8 lineup will feature St. Paul and the Broken Bones, Johnnyswim, Begonia, the Della Kit, Katie Tupper, and the Della Kit.

For the final day of the festival on Sunday July 9, Margo Price, Charley Crockett, Jake Vaadeland and the Sturgeon River Boys, The Bros. Landreth, and Eliza Mary Doyle will wrap things up.

Festival executive director Shannon Josdal said they are happy with this year’s ticketed lineup.

“We’re looking forward to bringing back some artists who have been popular favourites in the past, but we’re also excited to welcome new artists who have never played in Saskatchewan,” Josdal said in the release.

The festival will run from June 30 – July 9 with six days of free programming and four days of ticketed programming, according to the release.

People will be able to buy day passes for full access to ticketed performances.

“Each of the four ticketed days will feature five artists,” Josdal said. “Think of it as a one day, one pass, five shows.”

Passes will go on sale Monday and cost $75 in advance or $85 on the day of the show.

This will be the 36th annual festival, which will be held in Saskatoon’s Victoria park. It’s the second time the festival will be held in that location after moving from the Bessborough Gardens last year. 

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