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Greg Fertuck wants new chance at bail while he awaits outcome of trial

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A man accused of murder said he has been behind bars at the Saskatoon Correctional Centre for the last 1,310 days and is only allowed out three hours each day.

“It’s inhumane treatment,” Greg Fertuck told court on Monday, during a case management hearing.

Fertuck has been on remand since he was charged with first-degree murder in 2019.

Fertuck is accused of shooting his estranged wife Sheree Fertuck at a gravel pit near Kenaston, Sask. Sheree’s body has never been found.

A person is put on remand when they are charged with an offence, but not yet convicted.

In an effort to be released from custody, Fertuck had a bail hearing in 2020, but there was no conclusion. It was adjourned indefinitely by the request of his own lawyers.

Fertuck later made complaints about his lawyers, behind their backs, to the Law Society of Saskatchewan. As a result, they withdrew from the case.

Now, with Fertuck representing himself, Justice Richard Danyliuk said he’s welcome to submit a new bail application.

“If you want to bring an application to be released, pending the outcome of your trial, you are free to do that,” the judge told Fertuck, who stood in the prisoner’s box.

Danyliuk said he “appreciates this is frustrating” for Fertuck, but said it’s important to respect the justice system process.

Fertuck’s trial began over a year ago.

“I’m generally a patient person, but even my patience is wearing a bit,” the judge said.

As Fertuck has chosen to go without a lawyer and represent himself, an independent lawyer will be appointed as an amicus curiae — a “friend of the court” — to provide insight when needed.

The terms of the amicus curiae will be put in writing by the judge in the next 10 days.

Danyliuk still needs to decide whether statements Fertuck made to undercover officers can be used as evidence in the case.

The crown has made its submissions, but none have been filed by the defence.

The admissibility ruling is scheduled for April 28.  

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